Spud!

“Dig for victory”

We planted out one bed of potatoes a couple of weeks before the other beds. The plants started yellowing and drooping last week so it was time to check what Mother Nature had provided us with this year. There are a few more plants to dig up but one of the storage bins is almost full.

We cooked and ate some of them yesterday and they are good boiling potatoes that mash well. Nam nam!

There are three more beds of potatoes that will be ready to dig up in the next couple of weeks

We ate the last of the 2020 crop in July of this year. They were a bit squidgy raw but hadn’t turned green and were fine when cooked. We store them in mouse-proof bins in one of the cellar rooms and they seem to keep well there. In a good we should be self sufficient in potatoes for around 10 months.

The view…

…always different, always the same.

At this time of year the sun shines straight into the kitchen as we eat breakfast. Then, as autumn progresses as it slowly gets lower and lower in the sky hiding from us behind the hills.

The seasons change, like the stages of life whether we are ready for their arrival or not.

Fizz, crackle and pop!

A goods train that keeps lorries off our roads

Ice forms on the cables that carry the power for the trains. The ice causes the pickup on the locomotive to bounce off the cable making bright sparks and loud cracking noises.

First harvest

I picked our first tomato two days ago. We never had ripe tomatoes this early in Hallingdal and here are plenty more to come. We also have potato plants, some carrots, onions, kale and pumpkins that have survived the hot and dry summer.

Despite having an irrigation system none of our beans and peas have survived though so we have to upgrade the hose pipes to the “paddock” before next growing season

I ate the tomato today and it was delicious!

Ripe red plum tomato

Nam nam